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Frequently Asked Questions About Identity Theft

I remember my teachers always telling me there are no stupid questions. When it comes to identity theft, this is especially true. The more you know about identity theft, the better prepared you will be to prevent it from happening to you. Here are some commonly asked questions about identity theft.

http://www.dreamstime.com/stock-photos-identity-theft-red-words-binary-code-computer-monitor-image39907813What is identity theft?

Identity theft is when a person pretends to be you to access money, credit, medical care, and other benefits. They acquire your identity by stealing and using your personal information like government ID number or bank account number. Once they have this information, identity thieves can really wreak havoc on your life; for example, they can clear out your bank account. They can also impersonate you in order to get a job or commit a crime. It can take a long time to clean up the mess.

Does identity theft only have to do with stealing money or credit?

No, financial identity theft, using your personal information to access your money or credit, is not the only type of identity theft, although it is the most common. There are other kinds of identity theft identity theft. Medical identity theft is when someone uses your information to receive medical care. Criminal identity theft is when someone takes over your identity and assumes it as his or her own. They can then give your name to law enforcement officers and voilà—you have a criminal record.

What are some things I can do to protect my identity online?

  • Be choosy. Be careful when sharing personal information online. Just because a website is asking for your information doesn’t mean it’s necessary to provide it to them. Ask who wants the information and why. Also, limit the amount of information you share on social media. Does everyone need to know the year you were born?
  • Think twice. Use caution when clicking on links and opening email attachments. If the link or attachment is from someone you don’t know, don’t open it.
  • Use secure Wi-Fi. When shopping or banking online, make sure you are using a secure wireless connection.
  • Permanently delete files from your PC. Putting your files in the recycle bin isn’t enough. Your device will still have the files and therefore, are accessible to identity thieves. Use security software, like McAfee LiveSafe™ service, that includes a digital shredder to make sure those files are truly wiped from your PC.
  • Install security software. Make sure all your devices have comprehensive security software like McAfee LiveSafe that protects all your PCs, Macs, tablets and smartphones.

What are things I can do to protect my identity offline?

  • Shred. Use a cross-cut shredding machine, or scissors to shred old credit card statements, offers, receipts, etc., to prevent dumpster divers from obtaining your information and creating accounts in your name.
  • Have a locked mailbox. This will keep thieves from stealing your mail, especially bank statements and credit card offers.
  • Secure your files. Get a fire-proof safe to store sensitive documents including credit cards you hardly use.
  • Keep an eye on your bank and credit card statements. Look for questionable activity.
  • Be careful when using ATMs. When you insert your ATM card into a compromised machine or run your credit card through a phony card reader, you could become a victim of skimming. Skimming is where a hacker illegally obtains information from the magnetic strip on the back of your credit or ATM card. This information can then be used to access your accounts or produce a fake credit card with your name and details on it.

How do I know if my identity has been stolen?

This list is not comprehensive but gives you a good idea on what to look out for.

  • You receive a bill for a credit card account that, though in your name, is not yours. This probably means a thief opened the account in your name.
  • You’re no longer receiving your usual snail mail or email statements. Contact the issuer to find out why.
  • Unfamiliar purchases on your credit card, even tiny ones (crooks often start out with small purchases, and then escalate). Challenge even a $4 purchase.
  • You receive a credit card or store card without having applied for one. If this happens, immediately contact the company.
  • Your credit report has suspicious information, like inquiries for credit that you didn’t make.
  • Collectors are calling you to collect payments you owe, but you owe nothing.
  • Your credit score is high (last time you checked), but you were denied credit for a loan or new credit card. A thief can easily ruin a credit rating.

If my identity is stolen, what should I do?

Finding out that your identity has been stolen can be stressful. First, take a deep breath then follow these initial steps.

  • Contact your local or national law enforcement agency. File a report that your identity has been stolen.
  • Call your bank and credit card companies. Notify them of fraudulent activity. They may be able to reimburse you for any money lost or close any unauthorized accounts.
  • Check with credit reference agencies. Ask them to set up a fraud alert. Also, check to see if anyone has tried to get credit using your name.
  • Keep records. Keep track of all conversations and paperwork, the more detailed the better. Organize your data into one centralized place. This can be used as evidence for your case and can help you resolve the mess that identity theft can create.

To learn more about how you can protect yourself from identity theft, check out the Intel Security Facebook page or follow @IntelSec_Home on Twitter.

Robert Siciliano is an Online Security Expert to McAfee. He is the author of 99 Things You Wish You Knew Before Your Mobile was Hacked!  Disclosures.

Victim overcomes Identity Theft with Art

Does your wallet contain enough information about you for someone to steal your identity and commit crimes under your name? That’s what happened to Jessamyn Lovell when Erin Hart stole her wallet in 2011.

http://www.dreamstime.com/stock-photos-identity-theft-red-words-binary-code-computer-monitor-image39907813Hart shoplifted, checked into hotels and rented cars in Lovell’s name. Of all the nerve.

Lovell tracked Hart down and documented this in “Dear Erin Hart,” a photo project. Lovell couldn’t find the heartless Hart on her own, so she hired a private investigator. Turns out Hart was sitting in jail on numerous charges. Hart served eight months and upon exiting the city lockup, was photographed by Lovell.

That was just the start of stalking Hart. Lovell, the PI and two of his assistants followed the thief around all day, taking pictures of her doing ordinary things like buying cigarettes and shopping at a thrift store. The trail disintegrated after she entered an alley.

Lovell had a chance to confront Hart, but opted not to, concerned that it could turn ugly. But the several thousand dollars that this 2013 venture cost Lovell was worth it.

The following year Lovell, with the PI’s help, found Hart again. And in September 2014, Lovell opened her show at SF Camerawork—the very location of the wallet theft. Lovell is writing a book and hopes to have it out in March this year.

Lovell has also gone as far as sending an e-mail to Hart (via her probation officer), asking for Hart to respond, but Hart has not.

“I just wanted her to know that she impacted a real person,” Lovell says in an article on wired.com.

Lovell actually feels some degree of connection with her identity theif because she grew up poor and figures that Hart is hard up for money (though Hart certainly didn’t need to waste what little money she had on cigarettes). Nevertheless, she has no desire to try to make friends with Hart.

Robert Siciliano is an identity theft expert to BestIDTheftCompanys.com discussing identity theft prevention. Disclosures.

Why Hotels Check your ID

https://safr.me/webinar/  | Robert Siciliano is the #1 Security Expert in the United States with over 25 years of experience! He is here to help you become more aware of the risks and strategies to help protect yourself, your family, your business, and your entire life. Robert brings identity theft, personal security, fraud prevention and cyber security to light so that criminals can no longer hide in the dark. You need to be smarter than criminals yesterday so that they don’t take advantage of you today! If you would like to learn more about Security Awareness, then sign up for Robert’s latest webinar!

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I know someone who tried to make a hotel reservation over the phone. She goes by the name “Kelcie,” but her birth name is Frances. She hates her birth name. When making the reservation she used the name Kelcie, which is what’s on her credit card and checks, but her driver’s license says Frances.

8DShe was told that when she arrived, she’d need to present a photo ID. She asked if there’d be any problem since her driver’s license said Frances and the reservation said Kelcie. She was told most definitely. “Why should they care if the name on my photo ID doesn’t match the name in the reservation or my credit card? As long as I can pay for the room, right? You’d think I was applying for a government job!”

Why do some hotels require the photo ID or even information about your car, even if you have wads of money ready to pay for your stay?

In some areas, the law requires hotels to do this. But this answer only sets back the question further: Why does the law require this? The law also requires hotels and other lodging facilities to be able to turn over this information to the police when requested. A warrant is not necessary.

If we’re talking a little “ma and pa” motel, it’s actually more understandable that they’d require guests to show a photo ID, especially in a seedy part of town. If the room is trashed, the owner knows whom to go after.

But the large name-brand hotel is a bit different. Requiring a photo ID when someone uses a credit card or check is understandable. But some hotels also require it if the guest has cold cash.

The true answer would have to come from the lawmakers, even though we can think of some hypothetical scenarios in which a person could claim to be someone else and then get that person’s room—but the imposter would have to know ahead of time that the real guest had reserved the room. It’s not likely that the lawmakers have this scenario in mind for their reasons for requiring hotels to require photo IDs.

One plausible explanation is to protect people from fraudulent credit card use. More reasons include weeding out of imposters to make everything a bit safer by reducing nefarious activities such as drug use, meth labs, prostitution, or using the hotel room as a staging area for various crimes.

Hotels will want to do anything to cover their butts just in case a crime occurs. And I suppose the lawmakers have the hotel industry’s back.

If you are concerned about privacy of your personal information, you should be. But recognize that “personal identifying information” or PII is “public” and not private. So giving it to a hotel clerk shouldn’t be considered a “private” transaction. Know the risks.

Robert Siciliano is an identity theft expert to BestIDTheftCompanys.com discussing identity theft prevention. Disclosures.

What is Catphishing?

https://safr.me/webinar/  | Robert Siciliano is the #1 Security Expert in the United States with over 25 years of experience! He is here to help you become more aware of the risks and strategies to help protect yourself, your family, your business, and your entire life. Robert brings identity theft, personal security, fraud prevention and cyber security to light so that criminals can no longer hide in the dark. You need to be smarter than criminals yesterday so that they don’t take advantage of you today! If you would like to learn more about Security Awareness, then sign up for Robert’s latest webinar!

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What is catphishing? It certainly isn’t Garfield lazily sitting in a canoe holding a fishing rod. Catphishing is when a fraudster fabricates an identity and tricks someone via cyber communication into a phony emotional or romantic relationship—usually for financial gain to the scammer—because eventually he’ll hit the victim up for money.

1FBut another reason for catphishing is to lure someone into having a “relationship” with the scammer—to either ultimately publically humiliate them with this information if they’re well-known, or, to prove to a significant other that they’re capable of cheating. Not all catphishers are fraudulent. Sometimes, a person will catphish to catch a criminal.

One doesn’t get reeled in overnight, but the warning signs of the early stages of catphishing are clear: A too good to be true situation. The other party is very attractive (don’t bet for a second it’s really their photo). Another tell-tale sign that should make the alarm bells go off: This person comes out of thin air.

He…or she…will be reluctant to use the phone. Skype is out of the question: “I can’t figure out how to use it,” or, “It’s not compatible with my browser.” To maintain an air of legitimacy, the scammer will finally agree to meet you in person, making the plans sound like they’re running smoothly, but then at the last minute, must cancel the plans due to some crisis.

Some examples of real-life catphishing:

  • The DEA created the identity of a woman arrested on drug charges to nab drug dealers on Facebook.
  • Someone used the identity of a woman they personally knew, Ellie Flynn, to create phony accounts on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. This fleabag even used “Ellie Flynn” and her photo on dating sites.

So the issue isn’t just the idea of you being tricked into a relationship by the catphisher, but the possibility that YOUR photo, name and other data can be used by the catphisher to commit this crime against someone else or to use it for dating sites. Are you pretty good-looking? Makes you wonder about the possibilities…catphishers DO peruse Facebook for those who are physically blessed.

It’s really difficult to discover that your image/name is being used by a catphisher. For example, suppose your name is Ashlee Patrick and you’re gorgeous. And someone named Ann Casey has decided to use your Facebook profile photo for a dating site she wants to register with, or maybe she wants to create a Facebook account.

How will you ever learn of this…unless, by freako chance, someone who knows you just happens to be on Ann Casey’s (if that’s even her real name) Facebook page or is communicating to her via the dating site?

At any rate, if you’re lucky enough to discover someone has stolen your picture for fraudulent purposes, you can report their phony account.

Best ways to protect yourself?

  1. Stop uploading pictures of yourself is one option. This way you have more control of what’s out there.
  2. Use Google Reverse Image Search. https://www.google.com/imghp?gws_rd=ssl simply upload a photo and Google will seek it out.

Robert Siciliano is an identity theft expert to BestIDTheftCompanys.com discussing identity theft prevention. Disclosures.

Can Hackers Use FraudFox VM to Defeat Your Fraud Prevention?

In the last few days, a number of tech magazines like Computerworld and PC Advisor have reported that FraudFox VM poses a threat to the security of online businesses—especially banks and payment services.

4DFraudFox VM is a special version of Windows with a heavily modified version of the Firefox browser that runs on VMware’s Workstation for Windows or VMware Fusion on OSX. It’s for sale on Evolution, the apparent successor to the Silk Road online contraband market, for 1.8 bitcoins, or about $390.

FraudFox VM was created to defeat device recognition, or fingerprinting, which is used in fraud prevention to assess the risk of a device connecting to a business. Web browsers are used to collect data like operating system version, time zone and IP address. Each of these characteristic can be used to assess risk and uncover possible fraud.

So how worried should your business—and customers—be about this new software? I sat down with Scott Waddell the Chief Technology Officer of iovation, the fraud prevention experts, to find out what the reality is behind the media headlines.

  1. How reliant are banks and financial institutions on this kind of technology to stop fraudulent transactions these days? Is fingerprinting used more for mobile than on desktop?
    Banks leverage device reputation solutions with great success in both fraud mitigation and risk-based authentication strategies. Of course, good security is all about layered defenses, so smart banks use these tools as part of a defense-in-depth strategy to avoid over-reliance on any one security technology.Device recognition is used on all Internet connected devices these days, mobile and desktop alike. Mobile transactions are the fastest growing segment being protected with these tools, but the majority still originate from desktop operating systems.
  2. Do you think this would be an effective method for cybercriminals to get around those defenses?
    FraudFox VM may be interesting for its purpose-built virtual machine packaging, but there’s really nothing new in the approach. Tools have been available to fraudsters for years to facilitate changing device parameters, manipulating JavaScript, blocking data collection, obscuring IP address and location, and so on. Many of these capabilities have even migrated into easy-to-use settings in the major web browsers to make testing easier for web developers.Device reputation solutions have evolved along with such tools and continue to provide great uplift in fraud catch in spite of them.

    From the reported attributes that FraudFox can change, it would be unable to evade native recognition tools (those embedded in native desktop apps) and it would stumble over transactional similarity scoring on the web that considers more device attributes along with tagged recognition. So the tendency at financial institutions would be to trigger step-up authentication to one-time passwords through out-of-band channels (SMS, mobile app, voice) that FraudFox could not intercept.

  3. Is possible to fake browser fingerprints manually or using other tools? Does this thing look like a good consolidation of other tools that people might use to defeat fingerprinting?
    As previously mentioned, there are other tools and techniques fraudsters use to evade recognition or to try to mimic the devices of their victims. These often stand out from actual browsers in ways that defeat their intended purpose. A couple years ago, the Gozi Prinimalka trojan attempted to duplicate device attributes of compromised systems much as FraudFox VM aims to do. However, its limitations made it ineffective against modern device reputation offerings that evaluate risk and reputation through multiple strategies including link analysis, profiling techniques, velocity rules, proxy and Tor unmasking, device attribute anomalies, and more.FraudFox VM seems to be relatively limited in its capabilities considering the variety of techniques sophisticated fraud mitigation tools bring to bear.
  4. Any other thoughts?
    It’s certainly interesting to see tools like this for sale on Evolution, which appears to be catering to fraudsters and identity thieves. All the more reason for online businesses to take advantage of collaborative technologies that bring the power of community to the fight against the increasingly organized economy of cybercrime.

Fraudsters will always look for new ways to commit cybercrimes. However, a strategic, multi-layered approach to fraud prevention is the best defense.

Credit Card Fraud isn’t the same as Identity Theft

Just as important as taking down the decorations, throwing out all the debris from opened gifts and getting the house back in order after the holiday activities, is that of scrutinizing your credit card statements.

2CWhy? To make sure that all the purchases on there were made by you and only you. The holiday season means more credit card use = more identity theft. In this case, it’s “account takeover.”

The crook gets your credit (or debit) card information in one of several ways: digging through trash to get credit card information; tampering with ATMs; hacking; and perhaps the thief is the person you gave the card to to pay for your restaurant meal.

Yet another way the thief could get you is to obtain a new credit card line—using your name, address and Social Security number. He maxes out his new card and doesn’t pay the bill. One day you get a call from a collection agency, along with knowledge that your credit has been ruined. This is called “new account fraud”

Account takeover can be discovered via unauthorized charges on your statements, or the thief’s spending habits may alert the company (via its anomaly detection software) to something suspicious, such as a lot of spending halfway across the globe one hour after you purchased something in your home town.

You have 60 days to report suspicious activity to save yourself from paying the unpaid bills. The zero liability policy protects you. The most you’ll pay out is $50. But if you delay reporting the fraudulent activity, you’re screwed.

Thus, you must make time to just sit down and look over every charge on your statements, even if this means that the only time you have to do it is when you’re on the toilet. But you DO have time. You have time to read someone’s drivel on Facebook or something about Duchess Kate’s hair…you certainly have time to read your card statements every month.

Robert Siciliano is an identity theft expert to BestIDTheftCompanys.com discussing  identity theft prevention.

Synthetic Identity Theft hard to detect

A criminal can do a lot with “only” your Social Security number, says a report from darkreading.com. Okay, so he doesn’t have the name that goes with the number. Big deal—he’ll just make one up to go with it! This is called synthetic identity theft.

10DAnd this crime has proven worthwhile for the crooks. Nowadays, there’s an increased risk for this crime, says a report by ID Analytics. This is because thieves exploit new SSN randomization practices, says Dr. Stephen Coggeshall, author of the report, and chief analytics and science officer for ID Analytics.

In 2011, the SS Administration began issuing the numbers randomly rather than by pattern to help protect against ID theft. This change has backfired because it trips up anti-fraud technology that’s supposed to spot when a number, that was issued a few years ago, is linked to a phony identity.

The implementation of chip-and-pin cards will fuel the risk and growth of synthetic ID theft. Chip-and-pin point-of-sale transactions will inspire ID theft specialists to figure out new fraud tactics. And they will. They always will. They’re not dumb.

The ID Analytics report says that this crime goes undetected for long stretches because there’s no specific consumer victim. Like, who’s Alekksandreya Puytwashrinjeku? Or, who’s John Smith? Alekksandreya will open up small accounts just to get some credit going under “her” name. The next step is to apply for a big loan—that will never be paid.

The long-term nature of undetection allows the criminal to generate increasingly larger credit limits when compared to the typical ID theft case, says Coggeshall.

As you can see, there’s no actual consumer victim, but instead, the victims are the banks, along with the companies that offer the products that are illegally obtained by the fraudsters. The U.S. government is also a victim. The report explains that over a time period of three years, nearly 1.4 percent of tax returns seemed to be synthetic, costing the government $20 million.

You don’t hear much, if at all, about synthetic ID theft, but the report also points out that a credit card issuer did an analysis and discovered that over a three year period, about two percent of the total application volume consisted of this type of crime.

Still, an identity that incorporates identity theft protection is less likely to be victimized and more secure. And synthetic identity theft can sometimes be detected by a protection service.

Robert Siciliano is an identity theft expert to BestIDTheftCompanys.com discussing  identity theft prevention. For Roberts FREE ebook text- SECURE Your@emailaddress -to 411247. Disclosures.

7 Things You Can Do To Protect Your Identity

One of my favorite commercials is a guy working out with his personal trainer. The trainer asks him if he’s been eating his vegetables every day. When he replies, “When I can,” the trainer bops him on the head. He could have had a V8!

http://www.dreamstime.com/stock-photos-identity-theft-red-words-binary-code-computer-monitor-image39907813Just like the man thought that eating his daily vegetables would be hard, sometimes protecting your identity seems like a chore. But it doesn’t have to be that way. Here are 7 “duh” steps you can take to protect your identity this holiday season and all year round.

  1. Inspect credit card statements. Make a habit of regularly looking through your credit card statements for strange looking activity. If you notice just one unauthorized charge, assume that someone out there will strike again, and again and again—unless you take immediate action and contact your credit card company.
  2. Shred documents with personal information. Thieves will rummage through your garbage and recycling searching for intact documents that show Social Security numbers, credit cards and bank account information, etc. The next best thing to a cross-cut shredder is scissors. Shear up anything that could be revealing, including credit card purchase receipts.
  3. Review your credit reports. At least once a year, review your credit reports from the three major bureaus. This way you’ll be able to spot any suspicious actions, such as a thief opening a credit card account in your name.
  4. Credit freeze. If you’ve been a victim of identity theft, you might want to consider putting a freeze on your credit.While this will prevent you from getting loans or credit cards until you unfreeze it, this will also block criminals from opening accounts in your name and smearing your credit.
  5. Limit accessibility. In addition to using a shredder or scissors, consider getting a safe where you can store sensitive documents and limit the number of credit cards you carry with you. Have a list of important phone numbers (e.g., bank, credit card companies) already made up, in the event that you need to contact them immediately upon realizing you have lost or someone has stolen your identity or your physical credit cards, wallet, etc. 
  6. Password protection. If your device is lost or stolen, will someone be able to simply pick it up and access all your data? They won’t if it is password protected. Don’t use your cat’s name as your password; rather create a complicated password with upper and lower-case letters and numbers.
  7. Use comprehensive security software. It is essential that all your digital devices have updated security software, like McAfee LiveSafe™ service that can safeguard your data and protect against identity theft.

For more tips on protecting your identity, check out the Intel Security Facebook page or follow them on Twitter.

Robert Siciliano is an Online Security Expert to McAfee. He is the author of 99 Things You Wish You Knew Before Your Mobile was Hacked!  Disclosures.

Identity Theft of the Dead affects the Living

You don’t have to be living to have your identity stolen. Every year in America there’s 2.5 million cases of ID theft involving the deceased. And while your first reaction might be “So what, I’ll be dead and I won’t care”, you need to keep in mind that identity theft of the dead often significantly affects the living. How can this be prevented or at least, minimized?

http://www.dreamstime.com/stock-photos-identity-theft-red-words-binary-code-computer-monitor-image39907813Shut Down Social Media

Though it’s hard to do, closing down the decedent’s Facebook page will contribute to preventing ID theft.

Contact the Social Security Administration

This agency has a “death master file” of the SS numbers of deceased people that should be rendered inactive. This way a thief can’t use the number. Don’t wait for a funeral director to do this (though that’s their job); do it yourself for faster results.

Obits

When composing an obituary, people should post very little information. Crooks actually read these in search of a possible ID theft victim. The information to leave out includes names of survivors, complete addresses and professional history.

Receiving Bills

If a decedent’s identity has been hijacked, a survivor may begin receiving bills in that person’s name…and eventually, calls from collection agencies. “The problem isn’t so much financial — it’s emotional,” says Maria Cordeiro with the Chubb Group of Insurance Companies in an article from business-news.thestreet.com. You may have to be dragged through the pain of proving that your deceased loved-one is, in fact, no longer around.

How do you fix this problem?

  • Get all the needed documentation together, because you’ll need to send it out to any entity that requires it for proof.
  • Obtain a credit report prior to the person’s death. Of course, this works in cases of a diagnosed terminal condition versus accident. Once you have the person’s credit report, then six months after death, obtain another for comparison, says Cordeiro. The decedent’s name and SSN, six months later, should be in the death master file.
  • Do some credit monitoring. This is easier than obtaining a credit report for someone who’s dead.
  • Do a credit freeze. For a small fee, the credit report gets frozen shut, preventing a thief from opening a new account.

Robert Siciliano is an identity theft expert to BestIDTheftCompanys.com discussing  identity theft prevention. For Roberts FREE ebook text- SECURE Your@emailaddress -to 411247. Disclosures.

Security is Everyone’s responsibility

In the movies, the good guys always get the bad guys. In cyber reality, no such thing exists.

1DA survey of 5,000 IT security professionals turns up the following:

  • 63% doubt they can stop data breaches.
  • 69% think threats slip through the cracks of their security systems.
  • 57% believe their company lacks protection from advanced attacks.
  • 80% think their company’s leaders fail to connect the dots between a data breach and potential profit loss.

A survey of customers shows:

  • 59% are quite concerned about credit and debit card information theft.
  • 57% are very concerned about ID theft.
  • About 60% believe that a data breach involving their credit card or personal details would make them less likely to conduct business at a store or bank they usually use.

That last point leads to reputation smearing and loss of customer trust. But what about customer responsibility when it comes to security breaches? The “blame the customer” mentality seems more appropriate in the workplace when employees bring to work their own devices to assist in their jobs. This lets the data-breach cat out of the bag.

Though a significant percentage of employees have admitted (in surveys) to having a security problem with their device, a remarkably small percentage of these users felt compelled to report this to their boss. A very statistically significant number of employees who bring their devices to work haven’t even signed a formal contract that outlines security procedures. The bottom line is that taking security seriously is a rare find among employees who do the BYOD thing.

Another survey turned up an unsettling result: 76% of the 700+ consumers (who were affected by a breach) who were surveyed experienced stress from the event—but more than half didn’t even take steps to prevent ID theft afterwards.

Maybe this complacency can be in part explained by the fact that the losses from breaches are mostly absorbed by the companies involved.

The consumer, customer and employee need to step up to the plate and do their fair share of taking security measures seriously, rather than sitting back and letting businesses and banks take the entire burden.

It’s like getting attacked by a shark. Is the shark entirely to blame if the swimmer jumped into water near a sign that says “Beware of Sharks”? Then again, someone has to take the responsibility of putting the sign there in the first place…

All entities must pull together, stop finger pointing and accusing, and try to get a step ahead of the real villains.

Robert Siciliano is an identity theft expert to BestIDTheftCompanys.com discussing  identity theft prevention. For Roberts FREE ebook text- SECURE Your@emailaddress -to 411247. Disclosures.