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Hacker for hire a rising Trend

Hackers and wannabe hackers can easily purchase cheap tools of the trade online. The security firm Dell SecureWorks Inc. confirms this in their latest report and adds that underground markets for hackers, including those from Russia, is thriving.

11DThe “Dark Web” is the go-to place for hackers looking for guidance and tools like malware. Yes, you can buy malware. If you don’t want to be the hacker, you can hire a hacker.

There’s any number of reasons why a non-techy person would want to hire a hacker. Maybe that person wants to make money and thus hires a hacker to create a phishing campaign that generates lots of credit card numbers and other personal data for the hacker’s client to then open credit lines in victims’ names.

Maybe another client wants revenge on an ex-lover, their current boss or neighbor; they hire a hacker to crack into the target’s Facebook account, and then the client is able to log in, impersonate the victim and post comments and images that will make the victim look frightfully bad.

Dell SecureWorks Inc., also found:

  • For $129 a hacker will steal e-mails from personal Yahoo or Gmail accounts.
  • For business accounts, however, hackers want $500 per e-mail.
  • Wannabe hackers can buy phishing tutorials as well as other tutorials for $20 to $40.
  • Gee, for just $5 to $10, you can buy a Trojan virus that you can infiltrate someone’s computer with and control it—even if you’re a thousand miles away.

So booming is the hacker for hire and hacker-in-training industry, that these cybercriminals even offer customer service. Makes you wonder why hackers are selling their knowledge, tools and providing customer service, if they can make so much more money just hacking.

Well, maybe deep down inside, these crooks have a kind heart and want to help out people, even if it means helping them commit crimes. Another explanation is ego; they’re so good at what they do that they want to share their knowledge, albeit for a fee.

What else is for sale on the Dark Web? Stolen hotel points and frequent flyer accounts. Buyers can use these to get gift cards on legitimate sites, says the report from Dell SecureWorks Inc.

Robert Siciliano is an identity theft expert to BestIDTheftCompanys.com discussing identity theft prevention.

Russian Hackers getting rich from your Identity

Where’s the $$$ at? Selling credit card data. Have you heard of the Russian hacking ring that raked in two and a half billion dollars? Check it out: 4D

  • Phishing attacks are lucrative for these cybercriminals.
  • ATM hacks continue to increase, in part due to targeted attacks and new software.
  • Smartphone attacks are on the upswing.

There are three ways criminals obtain credit card data, and selling it is enormous business. And data breaching at the point of sale has been a big issue for the past few years. POS attacks are conducted with skimming tactics or by using Trojans. Unless significant changes are made, look for POS attacks to swell up, not shrivel up.

Selling credit card information is such big business that there exist professional wholesalers who specialize in this. Ukrainian, Russiona and many in eastern Europe are some of the largest brokers of and the main suppliers of stolen card data. But the wholesalers who purchase his acquired data are also rolling in the dough.

More on the Russian Hacking Empire

  • Lots of DDoS attacks
  • Over a quarter of a billion dollars in the sale of nefarious products
  • Spam, spam and more spam: an $841 million goldmine
  • A rise in the number of crime rings, the result of the development of new ways to commit theft off of users of smartphones.
  • In fact, several new crime rings have emerged this year that center on bank theft of mobile device users.

There’s currently just no end in sight for the Russian hackers, and there perhaps never will be, especially since geography is a barrier to prosecution.

6 ways to watch your statements.

  1. Monitor your paper statements monthly
  2. Monitor your e-statments when they come in
  3. Login to your credi card company’s website as often as you can
  4. Download your credit card company’s smartphone app and check often
  5. Sign up for Mint or BillGuards credit card alerts
  6. Go to your credit card company’s website and sign up for text and email alerts for every transaction.

Robert Siciliano is an identity theft expert to BestIDTheftCompanys.com discussing  identity theft prevention. For Roberts FREE ebook text- SECURE Your@emailaddress -to 411247. Disclosures.

Russian Organized Crime: Krem D’la Krem of Hackers

The Russians have definitely come…in the world of cybercrime. A Russian ring of hackers has amassed 1.2 billion stolen passwords and usernames involving 400,000 websites. The criminals have also garnered 542 million e-mail addresses.

11DAnd these Russians didn’t discriminate: Any website they could bust into, they did, ranging from big U.S. companies to little websites—anything. Most of these sites remain vulnerable.

Apparently, the thieves are not working for Russia’s government (which rarely goes after hackers anyways), nor have they sold the stolen information…yet. They’ve been paid by third-party entities who want to send out spam.

This gang of thieves operates like a business, with some doing the programming and others doing the stealing. The crooks use botnets to scope a site’s weaknesses, then plow in there.

This massive breach has called attention to the reliance that businesses have on usernames and passwords; this will need to be changed.

Tips for Preventing Getting Hacked

  • Say NO to clicking on links inside e-mails, even if the apparent (note “apparent”) recipient is your bank or a friend.
  • URL security. Trust only sites whose URL starts with a padlock icon and “https.” An “http” won’t cut it.
  • Two-step verification. If your financial institution offers this, then activate it. Call the bank if its website doesn’t have this information.
  • Online banking. If possible, conduct this on a separate computer just for this purpose.
  • Change the router’s default password; otherwise it will be easy for hackers to do their job.
  • Wired ethernet link. This is better than a powerline or Wi-Fi for protection. To carry out an ethernet attack, the thief would probably have to break into a home and set up a device, whereas Wi-Fi data can be snatched out of the air, and powerline data can leak into next-door.
  • Encryption. If you must use Wi-Fi or powerline networks, encryption will scramble data, but a hacker can crack into Wi’Fi’s WEP.
  • Say no to third-party Wi-Fi hotspots.
  • Security updates. Keeping up to date will guard against hackers who use a keylogger to figure out your keystroke pattern—which can tell him your passwords.
  • Hotshot Shield; This service protects you from fraudulent activity when you’re working online in an unprotected network (wired or wireless), such as at airports, hotels or coffee houses.
  • Get identity theft protection. Generally your identity is protected from new account fraud. Many of the services monitor your data on the dark web.

Robert Siciliano is an identity theft expert to BestIDTheftCompanys.com discussing  identity theft prevention. For Roberts FREE ebook text- SECURE Your@emailaddress -to 411247. Disclosures.