Faulty Tire Repair could break your Neck

Roy Chattelle was on a road trip in 2008 and suffered what seemed like a minor tire leak. So he got the tire repaired. Many people think nothing of pulling into the nearest tire shop and getting that little puncture or tear repaired or “plugged.”

7HA few months after this routine repair, the tire blew, causing the vehicle to flip five times. Chattelle and his kids recovered from their injuries, but wife Gwen had a very different outcome: She was rendered permanently paralyzed from the neck down.

An investigation into what caused this tire to blow out revealed that the tire shop was negligent: faulty repair and installation, leading to a thread belt separation. The Chattelles were awarded over $13 million.

According to an article at boston.cbslocal.com, many tire shops repair leaks from the outside of the tire. Glen Wilder of Wilder Brothers Auto is quoted as follows: “They just jam rubber into it until it stops leaking.”

When you take your slowly leaking tire, or tire that has a little nail in it, to the tire shop, do you really know what the employee there will do to ensure that the repair means a perfectly safe tire to drive on?

Wilder explains that the inside of the tire needs to be inspected. Sometimes tire shops won’t do this, upping the risk of a blowout. Repairs should be made with a plug-patch and also with a rubber sealant—and not all tire shops follow this recommendation, which comes from tire manufacturers.

Not only that, but there is no law making it illegal for tire shops to deliver substandard tire repairs. It’s legal to perform a shoddy repair using superglue, for instance.

In fact, bad tire repairs are common, says an article at newyork.cbslocal.com. “This is a dirty little secret,” says Robert Sinclair, AAA spokesman. Anything goes, he says, because there’s just no law that requires a minimum standard of tire repair. He points out that some tires are repaired with spit and tape, sawdust or “whatever is laying around.”

A punctured tire should be removed from the rim and inspected. Al Eisenberg, a tire repair expert for 30 years in Long Island, notes that shoddy repairs are a ticking time bomb. “It’s not a matter of if, but when that tire will blow.”

So what should you do?

Just buy a new tire. Forget worrying about whether or not the punctured or gashed tire was repaired effectively. If your circumstances leave you with no choice but to have the new tire installed at a shop other than the one at your vehicle’s dealership, then as soon as possible after the repair, take your vehicle into its dealership to have the new tire installation inspected to make sure it was done properly.

Robert Siciliano CEO of IDTheftSecurity.com, personal security and identity theft expert and speaker is the author of 99 Things You Wish You Knew Before Your Identity Was Stolen. See him knock’em dead in this identity theft prevention video.

Healthcare High on Hackers’ Hitlist

If you think that retailers are the biggest target for cyber criminals, you have it more than a wee bit wrong. Hackers are really going after the healthcare and pharmaceutical industries. In fact, “Will Healthcare Be the Next Retail?” is the name of a recent report released by BitSight Technologies, a security ratings firm.

4DThe report claims that not all victims of healthcare hacking report breaches, so figuring out the total number of these attacks is difficult. However, the Ponemon Institute released a report stating that hacking into healthcare and insurance companies has jumped 100 percent since 2010.

Why such a jump? It could be due to the fact that healthcare-type enterprises have gotten onto the BYOD (bring your own device) bandwagon. This is almost analogous to an employee infected with a stomach virus coming into the building and spreading the sickness.

Another dynamic: as more doctors use technology to stay connected to their patients, it won’t be surprising to see breaches become more common in the healthcare sector.

What distinguishes healthcare-industry hacking from retail hacking is that the retail hacker simply wants a credit card number. But the crook who cracks into medical records—that’s your patients’ individual profile chockfull of personal medical information.

Healthcare hackers may want to steal your patients’ identities to commit insurance fraud, so your records should be diligently monitored.

Robert Siciliano is an Identity Theft Expert to AllClearID. He is the author of 99 Things You Wish You Knew Before Your Identity Was Stolen See him knock’em dead in this identity theft prevention video. Disclosures.

Healthcare Providers Gaining Trust by Marketing Security

You’ve surely heard of “B2B” or business-to-business marketing. The new game plan is “B2C” – business to consumer marketing, particularly in the healthcare industry. The Affordable Care Act allows healthcare organizations to directly deal with consumers on a massive scale for the first time. However, this comes with some challenges, namely, how to effectively reach potential consumers and differentiate their organization from the competition.

3DOrganizations must take notice that potential enrollees aren’t just concerned about cost and coverage, but two less apparent concerns: privacy and security.

Consumers want reassurance that their data is protected. They can’t get all the data breach fiascos out of their mind. According to the TRUSTe 2014 U.S. Consumer Privacy Report, 92 percent of U.S. Internet users are worried about their online privacy. Of these, 47 percent are frequently worried.

So even though a potential enrollee may have complete faith in your service and reputation, they may be unnerved by the pathways of information exchange: the Internet, mobiles, wireless networks, computers. They know that their personal health data is out there in “space,” up for grabs.

If you want strong enrollment numbers and loyal customers, you must put the consumer’s concern for the protection of their personal health information at the top of the priority list. No way around this. If consumers don’t get assurance from you, they won’t stick around for it; they’ll take their business elsewhere.

So what will you do to put consumers’ apprehension at ease? One way to accomplish this is to facilitate a security and privacy program to ease consumer anxiety.

AllClear ID provides the following guidelines for healthcare insurers and providers:

  • Continue to use state-of-the-art IT techniques to secure cloud services, access points, databases and mobile devices; and to better monitor systems for breaches.
  • Improve security of corporate devices and employees’ personal mobile devices used for work.
  • Enhance employee training at all levels to decrease errors, improve device security and ensure HIPAA compliance. Also train employees around how to comfortably talk to customers about how their data will be protected.
  • Institute an identity protection program for enrollees to make them feel safe signing up with you and reduce the pain if there is a breach.

Robert Siciliano is an Identity Theft Expert to AllClear ID. He is the author of 99 Things You Wish You Knew Before Your Identity Was Stolen See him knock’em dead in this identity theft prevention video. Disclosures

Healthcare Establishing Customer Security Programs

Consumers really get stiffed when there’s a data breach, having to change their passwords, replace credit cards, and other bothersome tasks, not to mention the grief over stolen personal information.

10DHealthcare organizations (a prime target of cyber criminals for several reasons) need to think beyond the approach of, “Here’s how we’re protecting your data,” and shift their way of thinking to, “We are dead serious about our customers’ security.”

This is how healthcare organizations can be truly proactive. While organizations can’t reveal too much information about their security plans (since this can make it easier for exploitation), they DO need to be generous with candid messages about how vital it is to protect consumer data.

Throwing around the same generic, recycled language about “Here’s what we’re doing to protect you” no longer cuts it and doesn’t build a lot of trust in the consumer. Instead, organizations should impress upon consumers their devotion to security in meaningful and understandable ways.

Consumer security should be free to the customer. This will delight consumers and help ease their anxieties over data safety, while setting the organization apart from its competitors. That’s how to put the brand’s reputation at the top and build customer loyalty.

Key Features of a solid customer security program

  • Information must be protected at the time of sign-up/data collection, and protected should data be lost.
  • Being accountable for a data recovery and restoration in the event of a breach; this will build customer loyalty.
  • Financial loss must be recovered.
  • Credit reports must be restored.

According to AllClear ID, here is how healthcare organizations can make an impression on their customers:

  • Implementation of the most current IT practices should be done because it is paramount to secure mobile devices, access points, databases, cloud services, etc., and to better keep tabs on systems for breaches.
  • The security of employees’ personal mobiles and the organization’s devices needs to be stronger.
  • Employee training must be improved, from the bottom up, to reduce mistakes.
  • HIPAA compliance needs to be reinforced.
  • An identity protection plan must be created so that potential customers will have confidence in enrolling and feel less anxious about the fallout of a security breach.

Robert Siciliano is an Identity Theft Expert to AllClear ID. He is the author of 99 Things You Wish You Knew Before Your Identity Was Stolen See him knock’em dead in this identity theft prevention video. Disclosures.