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2017 Was the Worst year for Data Breaches EVER!

It seems like 2017 broke records for all the wrong reasons…one of them being the worst year for data breaches in history.

According to reports, hacking was the most common way to collect this data, but almost 70% of exposures occurred due to accidental leaks or human error. This came down to more than 5 billion records. There were several well-known public leaks, too, including the Amazon Web Services misconfiguration. More than half of the businesses using this service were affected, including companies like Verizon, Accenture, and Booz Allen Hamilton. The scariest part of this, however, is the fact that the number of breaches and the number of exposed records were both more than 24% higher than in 2016.

Big Breaches of Big Data

Another interesting thing to note is that eight of the big breaches that occurred in 2017 were in the Top 20 list of the largest breaches of all time. The top five biggest breaches in 2017 exposed almost 6 billion records.

Part of the reason for the big numbers is because huge amounts of data were exposed from huge companies, like Equifax. There was also a huge breach at Sabre, a travel systems provider, and the full extent of the breach isn’t even known at this point. All we do know is that it was big.

When looking at all of the known 2017 data breaches, almost 40% of the breaches involved businesses. About 8% involved medical companies, 7.2% involved government entities, and just over 5% were educational entities. In the US, there were more than 2,300 breaches. The UK had only 184, while Canada had only 116. However, until now, companies in Europe were not forced to report breaches, so things could change now that reporting is mandatory.

What were the biggest breaches of all time?  Here they are, in order:

  • Yahoo (US company) – 3 billion records
  • DU Caller Group (Chinese company) – 2 billion records
  • River City Media (US company) – 1.3 billion records
  • NetEase (Chinese company) – 1.2 billion records
  • Undisclosed Dutch company – 711 million records

Though none of this is great news, there is a silver lining here: none of the breaches of 2017 were more severe than any other breach in history, and overall, the occurrence of breaches dropped in the fourth quarter.

Because of so many breaches occurring due to human error, it’s very important that businesses of all sizes enact security awareness training, including helping staff understand what makes a business a target and what type of info the hackers want.

Robert Siciliano personal security and identity theft expert and speaker is the author of Identity Theft Privacy: Security Protection and Fraud Prevention: Your Guide to Protecting Yourself from Identity Theft and Computer Fraud. See him knock’em dead in this Security Awareness Training video.

Mainstream Email and Data Services Might Be Spying on You

The Internet nowadays flourishes on personal data. Many of the world’s largest companies rely on this intangible commodity that users have been too willing ‘donating’ as an exchange for a ‘free’ service.

As data replaces oil as the new premium commodity, buying and selling data is big business. While some companies do it legitimately, some entities do it illicit.

Let’s look at some stats:

  • Every day, there are more than 10 million hacker attacks
  • Every hour, more than 228,000 data records are lost or stolen
  • In 2017, thousands of data breaches exposed most everything from log-in names and passwords to Social Security numbers

But what is even more alarming, mainstream email and data services collect and then sell the data, such as: location, Internet search history, photos, files, and of course, more sensitive personal information. Sometimes they are compelled to give this information to the authorities without informing the owner of the data.

So, everyone is at risk of being monitored and lose valuable personal data.

However, there are ways to protect your data online.  One of the ways of doing it is by using Secure Swiss Data free encrypted email. This company has created easy-to-use secure email which has the following benefits:

  • End-to-end encryption – data is always encrypted, encryption is happening on a user’s device and data is stored encrypted on the Secure Swiss Data servers.
  • Swiss protection of the data – The servers are located in Switzerland under 320m of granite in the Swiss Alps. In addition, users’ data is protected by Swiss laws. In fact, Switzerland has some of the most stringent privacy laws in the world.
  • No Ads – another benefit is that they never display ads. This means the company has no reason to collect your data. They are not able to reador scan emails nor tracks any location information.
  • Privacy by Design – They use this approach which ensures that privacy is considered throughout the engineering process.

You can download Secure Swiss Data an Android or iOS app, and register a FREE account. With all the updates, so far, you can:

  • Send encrypted emails with attachmentsnot only to Secure Swiss Data users, but also to other third party email users.
  • Set expiration timer for emails so that they are automatically deleted from your and your recipients’ mailboxes after a set period of time.

One system to protect communications online with integrated blockchain

However, it seems that Secure Swiss Data team don’t want to stop there. They want to do more to secure communications and protect privacy online. At the same time they don’t want to depend on any third party or government investment. So, they are now starting a crowdfunding campaign:

To provide the world with a unique single encrypted communications and collaboration system that will include the following features: end-to-end encrypted email, calendar, notes, tasks, file storage, collaboration in encrypted files, and end-to-end encrypted messenger. 

On top of the end-to-end encryption, the Secure Swiss Data team will integrate blockchain in the system and therefore add another layer of security, which would increase customer convenience and quality of data protection online.

The cause – Take control over your data, and protect your Online Privacy

One of the best parts of using the Secure Swiss Data services is that you know where the company stands. They have clearly stated that they believe in privacy as a human right and civil liberty. User’s data should be kept private, and no one should be able to get into those personal accounts unsolicited.

Furthermore, they say: “Privacy is not about having something to hide, it’s about the right to control what you want to share and what you want to keep to yourself.”

So, have an opportunity to make the decision on what to share and what not.

And using services like the one from Secure Swiss Data, you can do just that: have control over your online data and communications.

Robert Siciliano personal security and identity theft expert and speaker is the author of Identity Theft Privacy: Security Protection and Fraud Prevention: Your Guide to Protecting Yourself from Identity Theft and Computer Fraud. See him knock’em dead in this Security Awareness Training video.

Protecting Yourself from a Data Breach requires Two Step Authentication

Have you ever thought about how a data breach could affect you personally? What about your business? Either way, it can be devastating. Fortunately, there are ways that you can protect your personal or business data, and it’s easier than you think. Don’t assume that protecting yourself is impossible just because big corporations get hit with data breaches all of the time. There are things you can do to get protected.

  • All of your important accounts should use two-factor authentication. This helps to eliminate the exposure of passwords. Once one of the bad guys gets access to your password, and that’s all they need to access your account, they are already in.
  • When using two-factor authentication, you must first enter your password. However, you also have to do a second step. The website sends the owner of the account a unique code to their phone also known as a “one time password”. The only way to access the account, even if you put the password in, is to enter that code. The code changes each time. So, unless a hacker has your password AND your mobile phone, they can’t get into your account.

All of the major websites that we most commonly use have some type of two-factor authentication. They are spelled out, below:

Facebook

The two-factor authentication that Facebook has is called “Login Approvals.” You can find this in the blue menu bar at the top right side of your screen. Click the arrow that you see, which opens a menu. Choose the Settings option, and look for a gold colored badge. You then see “Security,” which you should click. To the right of that, you should see Login Approvals and near that, a box that says “Require a security code.” Put a check mark there and then follow the instructions. The Facebook Code Generator might require a person to use the mobile application on their phone to get their code. Alternatively, Facebook sends a text.

Google

Google also has two-factor authentication. To do this, go to Google.com/2step, and then look for the blue “get started’ button. You can find it on the upper right of the screen. Click this, and then follow the directions. You can also opt for a text or a phone call to get a code. This also sets you up for other Google services, including YouTube.

Twitter

Twitter also has a form of two-factor authentication. It is called “Login Verification.” To use it, log in to Twitter and click on the gear icon at the top right of the screen. You should see “Security and Privacy.” Click that, and then look for “Login Verification” under the Security heading. You can then choose how to get your code and then follow the prompts.

PayPal

PayPal has a feature known as “Security Key.” To use this, look for the Security and Protection section on the upper right corner of the screen. You should see PayPal Security Key on the bottom left. Click the option to “Go to register your mobile phone.” On the following page, you can add your phone number. Then, you get a text from PayPal with your code.

Yahoo

Yahoo uses “Two-step Verification.” To use it, hover over your Yahoo avatar, which brings up a menu. Click on Account Settings and then on Account Info. Then, scroll until you see Sign-In and Security. There, you will see a link labeled “Set up your second sign-in verification.” Click that and enter your phone number. You should get a code via text.

Microsoft

The system that Microsoft has is called “Two-step Verification.” To use it, go to the website login.live.com. Look for the link on the left. It goes to Security Info. Click that link. On the right side, click Set Up Two-Step Verification, and then follow the prompts.

Apple

Apple also has something called “Two-Step Verification.” To use it, go to applied.apple.com. On the right is a blue box labeled Manage Your Apple ID. Hit that, and then use you Apple ID to log in. You should then see a link for Passwords and Security. You have to answer two questions to access the Security Settings area of the site. There, you should see another link labeled “Get Started.” Click that, and then enter your phone number. Wait for your code on your mobile phone, and then enter it.

LinkedIn

LinkedIn also has “Two-Step Verification.” On the LinkedIn site, hover your mouse over your avatar and a drop-down menu should appear. Click on Privacy and Settings, and then click on Account. You should then see Security Settings, which you should also click. Finally, you should see the option to turn on Two-Step Verification for Sign-In. Turn that on to get your code.

These are only a few of the major sites that have two-step verification. Many others do, too, so always check to see if your accounts have this option. If they don’t, see if there is another option that you can use in addition to your password to log in. This could be an email or a telephone call, for instance. This will help to keep you safe.

Amazon

Amazon’s Two-Step Verification adds an additional layer of security to your account. Instead of simply entering your password, Two-Step Verification requires you to enter a unique security code in addition to your password during sign in.

Without setting up Two Step authentication for your most critical accounts, all a criminal needs is access to your username, which is often your email address and then access data breach files containing billions of passwords that are posted all over the web. Once they search your username/email for the associated password, they are in.

Two factor locks them out.

Robert Siciliano personal security and identity theft expert and speaker is the author of 99 Things You Wish You Knew Before Your Identity Was Stolen. See him knock’em dead in this identity theft prevention video.

Top 10 Tips for Securing Your Mobile Devices and Sensitive Client Data

Do you have employees who bring mobile phones to work and use those devices on the corporate network? Do they store company data on these “Bring Your Own Devices (BYOD)”?? Does your company have a policy in place for this?

First, the moment a person brings in their personal phone to work, there is a fusion of personal and business tasks that occur. And, equally as bad, company issued devices are used for personal use as much, if not more than the employees own devices. Not sure you believe this? Here are some stats:

A recent survey asked 2,000 office workers about their habit of using their personal mobile devices at work. Here’s what it found:

  • 73% of people admit to downloading personal apps to tablets they got from their company.
  • 62% of people admit to downloading personal apps to mobile phones they got from their company.
  • 45% of people admit to downloading personal apps to notebooks they got from their company.
  • The people who were most likely to do this were in the 25 to 38-year-old age group.
  • 90% of people use their personal mobile devices to conduct business for work.

As you can see, a lot of people are using their mobile devices on the job, and this could not only put your company data at risk, but also the data associated with your clients. Do you have a plan to minimize or even totally prevent how much sensitive company data is wide open to hackers?

Solutions to Keep Sensitive Business Information Safe

Decision makers and business owners should always consider their personal devices as equal to any business device. You definitely don’t want your sensitive company information out there, and this information is often contained on your personal mobile or laptop device. Here are some things that you can do to keep this information safe:

Give Your Staff Information About Phishing Scams

Phishing is a method that cybercriminals use to steal data from companies. Studies show that it is extremely easy for even the smartest employees to fall for these tricks. Here’s how they work: a staff member gets an email with a sense of urgency. Inside the email is a link. The body of the email encourages the reader to click the link. When they do, they are taken to a website that either installs a virus onto the network or tricks the employee into giving out important company information.

Inform Your Staff that the Bad Guys Might Pose as Someone They Know

Even if you tell your staff about phishing, they can still get tricked into clicking an email link. How? Because the bad guys make these emails really convincing. Hackers do their research, and they are often skilled in the principles of influence and the psychology of persuasion. So, they can easily create fake emails that look like they come from your CEO or a vendor, someone your staff trusts. With this in mind, it might be best to create a policy where employees are no longer allowed to click email links. Pick up the phone to confirm that whatever an email is requesting, that the person who sent it is legitimate.

Teach Employees that Freebies aren’t Always Goodies

A lot of hackers use the promise of something free to get clicks. Make sure your staff knows to never click on an email link promising a freebie of any kind.

Don’t Buy Apps from Third-Party Sources

Apps are quite popular, and there are many that can help to boost productivity in a business setting. However, Apple devices that are “jailbroken” or Android devices that are “rooted” are outside of the walled garden of their respective stores and susceptible to malicious viruses. Make sure your employees know that they should never buy an app from a third-party source. Only use the official Apple App Store or the Google Play Store.

Always Protect Devices

It’s also important that you advise your employees to keep their devices protected with a password. These devices are easy to steal since they are so small. If there is no password, there is nothing stopping a bad guy from getting into them and accessing all of the accounts that are currently logged into the device.

Install a Wipe Function on All Mobile Devices Used for Business

You should also require all employees to have a “wipe” function on their phones. Even if they are only doing something simple, like checking their work email on their personal mobile device, it could get into the wrong hands. With the “wipe” function, the entire phone can be cleared remotely. You should also require employees to use the setting that erases the phone after a set number of password attempts.

Require that All Mobile Devices on the Company Network Use Anti-Virus Software

It’s also important, especially in the case of Android devices, that all mobile devices on the network have some type of anti-virus software.

Do Not Allow Any Jailbroken Devices on Your Company’s Network

Jailbroken devices are much more vulnerable to viruses and other malware. So, never allow an employee with a jailbroken phone to connect to your network.

All Employees Should Activate Update Alerts

One of the easiest ways to keep mobile devices safe is to keep them updated. So, make sure that all employees have update alerts enabled, and make sure that they are updating their devices when prompted or automatically.

Teach Employees About the Dangers of Public Wi-Fi

Finally, make sure your staff knows the dangers of using public Wi-Fi. Public Wi-Fi connections are not secure, so when connected, your devices are pretty open. That means, if you are doing things that are sensitive, such as logging into company accounting records, a hacker can easily follow. Instead, urge employees to use a VPN. These services are inexpensive and they encrypt data so hackers can’t access it.

Robert Siciliano personal security and identity theft expert and speaker is the author of 99 Things You Wish You Knew Before Your Identity Was Stolen. See him knock’em dead in this identity theft prevention video.

Top 12 Tips to Destroy Your Sensitive Data

Believe it or not, you just can’t shred too much. If you aren’t destroying your sensitive data, my best advice is for you to start now. There are people out there who make a living diving into dumpsters in search of credit card info, bank account number, mortgage statements, and medical bills; all things they can use to steal your identity.  

Here are 12 tips that you can use to help you destroy your sensitive data:

  1. Buy a shredder. That said, I don’t own a shredder. I’ll explain shortly. There are a number of different brands and models out there. Some even shred CDs. This is important if you keep your documents saved on a computer, which you then saved to a CD. Don’t, however, try to shred a CD in a shredder that isn’t equipped to do this job. You will definitely break it.
  2. Skip a “strip-cut” shredder. These shredders produce strips that can be re-constructed. You would be surprised by how many people don’t mind putting these pieces together after finding them in trash. Yes, again, people will go through dumpsters to find this information. Watch the movie “Argo” and you’ll see what I mean.
  3. Shred as small as you can using a cross cut shredder. The smaller the pieces, the more difficult it is to put documents together again. If the pieces are large enough, there are even computer programs that you can use to recreate the documents.
  4. Fill a large cardboard box with your shreddables. You can do this all in one day, or allow the box to fill up over time.
  5. When the box is full, burn it. This way, you are sure the information is gone. Of course, make sure that your municipality allows burning.
  6. You should also shred and destroy items that could get you robbed. For instance, if you buy a huge flat screen television, don’t put the box on your curb. Instead, destroy, shred, or burn that box. If it’s on the curb, it’s like an invitation for thieves to come right in.
  7. Shred all of your documents, including any paper with account numbers or financial information.
  8. Shred credit card receipts, property tax statements, voided checks, anything with a Social Security number, and envelopes with your name and address.
  9. Talk to your accountant to see if they have any other suggestions on what you should shred and what you should store.
  10. Shred anything that can be used to scam you or anyone. Meaning if the data found in the trash or dumpster could be used in a lie, over the phone, in a call to you or a client to get MORE sensitive information, (like a prescription bottle) then shred it.
  11. Try to buy a shredder in person, not online. Why? Because you want to see it and how it shreds, if possible. If do buy a shredder online, make sure to read the reviews. You want to make sure that you are buying one that is high quality.
  12. Don’t bother with a shredder. I have so much to shred (and you should too) that I use a professional document shredding service.

I talked to Harold Paicopolos at Highland Shredding, a Boston Area, (North shore, Woburn Ma) on demand, on-site and drop off shredding service. Harold said “Most businesses have shredding that needs to be done regularly. We provide free shredding bins placed in your office. You simply place all documents to be shredded in the secure bin. Your private information gets properly destroyed, avoiding unnecessary exposure.”

Does your local service offer that? Shredding myself takes too much time. And I know at least with Highlands equipment (check your local service to compare) their equipment randomly rips and tears the documents with a special system of 42 rotating knives. It then compacts the shredded material into very small pieces. Unlike strip shredding, this process is the most secure because no reconstruction can occur.

Robert Siciliano personal security and identity theft expert and speaker is the author of 99 Things You Wish You Knew Before Your Identity Was Stolen. See him knock’em dead in this identity theft prevention video.

Second Hand and Discarded Devices Lead to Identity Theft

A new study was just released by the National Association for Information Destruction. What did it find? Astonishingly, about 40% of all digital devices that are found on the second-hand market had personal information left on them. These include tablets, mobile phones, and hard drives.

The market for second hand items is large, and it’s a good way to find a decent mobile device or computer for a good price. However, many times, people don’t take the time to make sure all their personal information is gone. Some don’t even understand that the data is there. This might include passwords, usernames, company information, tax details, and even credit card data.  What’s even more frightening is that this study used simple methods to get the data off the devices. Who knows what could be found if experts, or hackers, got their hands on them. It wouldn’t be surprising to know they found a lot more.

Here are some ways to make sure your devices are totally clean before getting rid of them on the second-hand marketplace:

  • Back It Up – Before doing anything, back up your device.
  • Wipe It – Simply hitting the delete button or reformatting a hard drive isn’t’ enough. Instead, the device has to be fully wiped. For PCs, consider Active KillDisk. For Macs, there is a built in OS X Disk Utility. For phones and tablets, do a factory reset, and then a program called Blancco Mobile.
  • Destroy It – If you can’t wipe it for some reason, it’s probably not worth the risk. Instead, destroy the device. Who knows, it might be quite fun to take a sledge hammer to your old PC’s hard drive, right? If nothing else, it’s a good stress reliever!
  • Recycle It – You can also recycle your old devices, just make sure that the company is legitimate and trustworthy. The company should be part of the e-Stewards or R2, Responsible Recycling, programs. But destroy the hard drive first.

Record It – Finally, make sure to document any donation you make with a receipt. This can be used as a deduction on your taxes and might add a bit to your next tax return.

Robert Siciliano personal security and identity theft expert and speaker is the author of 99 Things You Wish You Knew Before Your Identity Was Stolen. See him knock’em dead in this identity theft prevention video.

Study Shows Millennials Choose Convenience Over Security

To those of us consider Tom Cruise the movie star of our day or even Grunge as the music we grew up with, looking at millennials, and the way they view life, is fascinating. These “kids” or young adults, many are brilliant. They really do define “disruption”.

However, that doesn’t mean that this tech savvy generation is always right. In fact, a new study shows just the opposite when it comes to internet safety. Though, they can also teach us a few things and are definitely up to speed on the value of “authentication” (which leads to accountability).

Anyway…South by Southwest, or SXSW, is a festival and conference that is held each year in Austin, TX. This year, a survey was done with some good AND scary results. The company that did the survey, SureID, found that 83% of millennials that were asked believed that convenience is more important than safety. That’s not good. But this is not the only interesting finding, however. On a positive note, the study also found the following:

  • About 96% want to have the ability to verify their identity online, which would ensure it was safe from hackers.
  • About 60% put more value on time than they do their money or safety.
  • 79% are less likely to buy something from a person who can’t prove their identity.
  • 70% feel more comfortable interacting with a person online if they can verify that other person’s identity.
  • 91% say they believe that companies “definitely” or “maybe” do background checks on those who work for them. These include on-demand food delivery and ridesharing. However, most companies do not do this.

What does this information tell us? It says that we are very close to seeing a shift in the way millennials are viewing their identities, as well as how they view the people and businesses they interact with.

Millennials have a need to want to better verify another person’s identity. To support this, just look at dating apps. Approximately 88% of people using them find the idea of verifying the identity of the people they might see offsite as appealing. It’s similar with ride sharing, where about 75% of millennials want to know, without a doubt, who is driving them around.

We live in a world today that is more connected than ever before. These days, as much as 30% of the population is working as freelancers, or in another type of independent work. In many cases, this work is evolving from small gigs to large and efficient marketplaces. Thus, the need for extra security and transparency is extremely important. Sometimes, technology helps us act too comfortably with people we don’t really know, and the study shows that having people prove whom they are will help to create higher levels of trust.

Robert Siciliano personal security and identity theft expert and speaker is the author of 99 Things You Wish You Knew Before Your Identity Was Stolen. See him knock’em dead in this identity theft prevention video.

Security training: the Human Being is impossible to fix

As long as humans sit at computer screens, there will always be infected computers. There’s just no end to people being duped into clicking links that download viruses.

12DA report at theregister.co.uk explains how subjects, unaware they were guinea pigs, fell for a phishing experiment.

  • Subjects were sent an FB message or e-mail from an unfamiliar sender, though 16 percent of the subjects who ultimately clicked reported they knew the sender.
  • The sender announced they had images from a New Year’s Eve party but not to share them.
  • 43.5% clicked the FB message link and one-quarter clicked the e-mail link.
  • Many of the subjects denied making these clicks, but most who admitted it named curiosity as the reason.
  • 5% claimed they thought their browser would protect them from an attack.

Obviously, there will always be that percentage of the human population who will allow curiosity to preside over common sense and logic. The idea of simply never, never, ever clicking a link inside an e-mail is an impossible feat for them—perhaps more difficult than quitting smoking or losing 50 pounds.

This is the battle that businesses have with their employees, which is how businesses get hacked into and massive data breaches result.

However, says the report, rigid training of employees may backfire because valid e-mails may be ignored—though it seems that there has to be a way for companies to get around this—perhaps a phone call to the sender for verification if the company is small. For large businesses, maybe executives could just resort to the old-fashioned method of reaching out to employees; how was this done before the World Wide Web was invented?

Digital signing of e-mails has been suggested, but this, too, has a loophole: some employees misinterpreting the signatures.

Nevertheless, security training is not all for nothing; ongoing training with staged phishing e-mails has been proven, through research, to make a big difference. Unfortunately, there will always exist those people who just can’t say “No” to something as mundane as images from a New Year’s Eve party from a sender they’ve never even heard of.

Robert Siciliano personal security and identity theft expert and speaker is the author of 99 Things You Wish You Knew Before Your Identity Was Stolen. See him knock’em dead in this identity theft prevention video.

Three ways to beef up security when backing up to the cloud

Disasters happen every day. Crashing hard drives, failing storage devices and even burglaries could have a significant negative impact on your business, especially if that data is lost forever. You can avoid these problems by backing up your data.

Backing up means keeping copies of your important business data in several places and on multiple devices. For example, if you saved data on your home PC and it crashes, you’ll still be able to access the information because you made backups.

A great way to protect your files is by backing up to the cloud. Cloud backup services like Carbonite allow you to store data at a location off-site. You accomplish this by uploading the data online via proprietary software.

Cloud backup providers have a reputation for being safe and secure. But you can’t be too careful. Here are a few ways to beef up security even more when you use a cloud backup system:

  • Before backing up to the cloud, take stock of what data is currently in your local backup storage. Make sure that all of this data is searchable, categorized and filed correctly.
  • Consider taking the data you have and encrypting it locally, on your own hard drive before backing up to the cloud. Most cloud backup solutions – including Carbonite – provide high-quality data encryption when you back up your files. But encrypting the data locally can add an additional layer of security. Just remember to store your decryption key someplace other than on the computer you used to encrypt the files. This way, if something happens to the computer, you’ll still be able to access your files after you recover them from the cloud.
  • Create a password for the cloud account that will be difficult for any hacker to guess. However, make sure that it’s also easy for you to remember. The best passwords are a combination of numbers, letters and symbols.

Cloud backups are convenient and have a good record when it comes to keeping your data safe. It doesn’t require the purchase of additional equipment or the use of more energy. You can also restore data from anywhere, to any computer, as long as there is an Internet connection available.

Consultant Robert Siciliano is an expert in personal privacy, security and identity theft prevention. Learn more about Carbonite’s cloud and hybrid backup solutions for small and midsize businesses. Disclosures.

How much is your Data worth online?

Cyber crime sure does pay, according to a report at Intel Security blogs.mcafee.com. There’s a boom in cyber stores that specialize in selling stolen data. In fact, this is getting so big that different kinds of hot data are being packaged—kind of like going to the supermarket and seeing how different meats or cheeses are in their own separate packages.

10DHere are some packages available on the Dark Net:

  • Credit/debit card data
  • Stealth bank transfer services
  • Bank account login credentials
  • Enterprise network login credentials
  • Online payment service login credentials

This list is not complete, either. McAfee Labs researchers did some digging and came up with some pricing.

The most in-demand type of data is probably credit/debit card, continues the blogs.mcafee.com report. The price goes up when more bits of sub-data come with the stolen data, such as the victim’s birthdate, SSN and bank account ID number. So for instance, let’s take U.S. prices:

  • Basic: $5-$8
  • With bank ID#: $15
  • With “fullzinfo” (lots more info like account password and username): $30
  • Prices in the U.K., Canada and Australia are higher across the board.

So if all you purchase is the “basic,” you have enough information to make online purchases—and can keep doing this until the card maxes out or the victim reports the unauthorized charges.

However, the “fullzinfo” will allow the thief to get into the account and change information, thwarting the victim’s attempts to get things resolved.

How much do bank login credentials cost?

  • It depends on the balance.
  • $2,200 balance: $190 for just the login information
  • For the ability to transfer funds to U.S. banks: $500 to $1,200, depending on the balance.

Online premium content services offer a variety of services, and the login credentials to these are also for sale:

  • Video streaming: $0.55 to $1
  • Cable channel streaming: $7.50
  • Professional sports streaming: $15

There are so many different kinds of accounts out there, such as hotel loyalty programs and auction. These, too, are up for sale on the underground Internet. Accounts such as these have the thief posing as the victim while carrying out online purchases.

Robert Siciliano is an identity theft expert to TheBestCompanys.com discussing  identity theft prevention.