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DoorDash Admits 4.9 Million Affected by Data Breach

DoorDash has admitted that it has been the victim of a data breach, which has affected about 4.9 million merchants and people.

In a recent blog post, DoorDash announced that it noticed some odd activity early in September from a third-party service. After looking into it, the company found that an unauthorized third party was accessing user data from DoorDash on May 4, 2019. DoorDash immediately took steps to stop any future access and to improve security.

Those who were affected by this breach joined DoorDash on April 5, 2018 or before. Those who joined after that specific date were not part of this breach. The company said it will contact those customers who were affected.

This breach involved data including email addresses, names, order history, delivery addresses, phone numbers, and encrypted passwords. In some situations, bank account numbers and the last four digits of payment cards were also released. Additionally, the driver’s license numbers of approximately 100,000 delivery people were accessed. Bank account information and full payment card numbers were not compromised.

This data is called PII or Personal Identifying Information that could be used to open new accounts, take over existing or “socially engineer” you. Going forward, as with all data breaches be on the lookout for scammy emails and phone calls. Be suspect every time the phone rings and make sure unless you are 100% sure, you aren’t clicking links in emails even if you recognize the sender.

DoorDash also said that it has added additional layers of security in order to protect the data of its customers, and it has improved the protocols that are used to get access to this data. The company has also told customers that it is a smart idea to change their passwords, even if they were not affected.

ROBERT SICILIANO CSP, is a #1 Best Selling Amazon author, CEO of CreditParent.com, the architect of the CSI Protection certification; a Cyber Social and Identity Protection security awareness training program.

The “Mother of All Data Breaches?” It Could Be Here…

You have probably heard of one data breach after another these days, but this is one that you should really pay attention to: more than 772 million unique emails, along with more than 21 million unique passwords, have been exposed.

data breach

Troy Hunt, who runs the website “Have I Been Pwned,” first reported this breach, and he says that a huge file (87 GB) was uploaded to MEGA, a cloud service. This data was then sent to a popular hacking site, and now hackers have access to all of these passwords and email addresses.

This data breach, known as “Collection #1,” is very serious. However, it could just be the tip of the iceberg. There are claims that there are several more “collections” out there, and it could be as much as one full terabyte worth of data. This could be the newest “mother of all data breaches” if this is found to be true.

So, what does all of this mean for you? It not only means that your information could be part of this breach, but it also could mean that these password and email combinations could be used in a practice known as “credential stuffing.” What is this? It’s when a hacker uses known email and password combinations to hack into accounts. Basically, this could have an impact on anyone who has used an email/password combination on more than one site.

This, of course, is concerning because this particular breach has about 2.7 billion email/password combinations. On top of that, around 140 million of the emails, and 10 million of the passwords, were brand new to the hacking database, which gives the hackers even more ammunition to wreak havoc. The big lesson to be learned here is that you should always use good security practices when you create accounts online. You should never use passwords from one account to another, and you should definitely use two-factor authentication if it is available. If you don’t have a password manager, you might want to set that up, too.

Robert Siciliano personal security and identity theft expert and speaker is the author of Identity Theft Privacy: Security Protection and Fraud Prevention: Your Guide to Protecting Yourself from Identity Theft and Computer Fraud. See him knock’em dead in this Security Awareness Training video

Second Hand USB’s Could Have Personal Info Still Inside

An unsurprising study was recently released that found even when a portable USB drive is erased, not all of the documents and images are always removed. That, of course, is frightening.

Here’s how the research was done:

Researchers went online to sites like eBay, to second-hand shops, and even auction stores. They bought 200 used USB drives, half from the US and half from the UK. Almost 2/3 of the devices had data on them! This data was, for the most part, personal data, and it can also be used by cybercriminals to steal someone’s identity. On top of that, these USB drives can contain malware.

Removing All Data is Difficult

When someone tries to delete or remove data from a USB device, they rarely have success. In fact, of the 100 USB devices the researchers bought in the US, only 18 of them were totally wiped clean. The rest of them had data that had been deleted, but someone could certainly recover it. The UK devices were similar. What’s so surprising about this is that it is extremely easy…and free…for someone to fully delete their device. But most people just don’t put in the effort, and that could definitely hurt them in the future.

USB Devices Can Be Risky

Using these devices can be risky, not only for average people, but also for businesses. In 2017, for example, a USB device was lost, and it contained sensitive information about Heathrow Airport. The government investigated, and eventually fined the company. The information was not encrypted, nor password protected, and it was found on the street by a random passerby.

Because of these risks, some companies, like IBM, have banned the use of USB devices. Instead, employees must use the company’s cloud. Other companies still allow them, of course, but they could be going down a dangerous road. These devices are really cheap to buy, and people can save almost anything on them, but they are also very easy to lose.

There are other issues with USB devices too. First, of course, you have the data on these drives to deal with, but there is also the fact that potential malware could be on the devices. Most companies don’t have the same rules that IBM has, and most consumers don’t think of this at all. This makes people and small businesses very vulnerable. So, if you use USB drives, there is one very important step that you need to take: encrypt it.

Robert Siciliano personal security and identity theft expert and speaker is the author of Identity Theft Privacy: Security Protection and Fraud Prevention: Your Guide to Protecting Yourself from Identity Theft and Computer Fraud. See him knock’em dead in this Security Awareness Training video.

2017 Was the Worst year for Data Breaches EVER!

It seems like 2017 broke records for all the wrong reasons…one of them being the worst year for data breaches in history.

According to reports, hacking was the most common way to collect this data, but almost 70% of exposures occurred due to accidental leaks or human error. This came down to more than 5 billion records. There were several well-known public leaks, too, including the Amazon Web Services misconfiguration. More than half of the businesses using this service were affected, including companies like Verizon, Accenture, and Booz Allen Hamilton. The scariest part of this, however, is the fact that the number of breaches and the number of exposed records were both more than 24% higher than in 2016.

Big Breaches of Big Data

Another interesting thing to note is that eight of the big breaches that occurred in 2017 were in the Top 20 list of the largest breaches of all time. The top five biggest breaches in 2017 exposed almost 6 billion records.

Part of the reason for the big numbers is because huge amounts of data were exposed from huge companies, like Equifax. There was also a huge breach at Sabre, a travel systems provider, and the full extent of the breach isn’t even known at this point. All we do know is that it was big.

When looking at all of the known 2017 data breaches, almost 40% of the breaches involved businesses. About 8% involved medical companies, 7.2% involved government entities, and just over 5% were educational entities. In the US, there were more than 2,300 breaches. The UK had only 184, while Canada had only 116. However, until now, companies in Europe were not forced to report breaches, so things could change now that reporting is mandatory.

What were the biggest breaches of all time?  Here they are, in order:

  • Yahoo (US company) – 3 billion records
  • DU Caller Group (Chinese company) – 2 billion records
  • River City Media (US company) – 1.3 billion records
  • NetEase (Chinese company) – 1.2 billion records
  • Undisclosed Dutch company – 711 million records

Though none of this is great news, there is a silver lining here: none of the breaches of 2017 were more severe than any other breach in history, and overall, the occurrence of breaches dropped in the fourth quarter.

Because of so many breaches occurring due to human error, it’s very important that businesses of all sizes enact security awareness training, including helping staff understand what makes a business a target and what type of info the hackers want.

Robert Siciliano personal security and identity theft expert and speaker is the author of Identity Theft Privacy: Security Protection and Fraud Prevention: Your Guide to Protecting Yourself from Identity Theft and Computer Fraud. See him knock’em dead in this Security Awareness Training video.

Mainstream Email and Data Services Might Be Spying on You

The Internet nowadays flourishes on personal data. Many of the world’s largest companies rely on this intangible commodity that users have been too willing ‘donating’ as an exchange for a ‘free’ service.

As data replaces oil as the new premium commodity, buying and selling data is big business. While some companies do it legitimately, some entities do it illicit.

Let’s look at some stats:

  • Every day, there are more than 10 million hacker attacks
  • Every hour, more than 228,000 data records are lost or stolen
  • In 2017, thousands of data breaches exposed most everything from log-in names and passwords to Social Security numbers

But what is even more alarming, mainstream email and data services collect and then sell the data, such as: location, Internet search history, photos, files, and of course, more sensitive personal information. Sometimes they are compelled to give this information to the authorities without informing the owner of the data.

So, everyone is at risk of being monitored and lose valuable personal data.

However, there are ways to protect your data online.  One of the ways of doing it is by using Secure Swiss Data free encrypted email. This company has created easy-to-use secure email which has the following benefits:

  • End-to-end encryption – data is always encrypted, encryption is happening on a user’s device and data is stored encrypted on the Secure Swiss Data servers.
  • Swiss protection of the data – The servers are located in Switzerland under 320m of granite in the Swiss Alps. In addition, users’ data is protected by Swiss laws. In fact, Switzerland has some of the most stringent privacy laws in the world.
  • No Ads – another benefit is that they never display ads. This means the company has no reason to collect your data. They are not able to reador scan emails nor tracks any location information.
  • Privacy by Design – They use this approach which ensures that privacy is considered throughout the engineering process.

You can download Secure Swiss Data an Android or iOS app, and register a FREE account. With all the updates, so far, you can:

  • Send encrypted emails with attachmentsnot only to Secure Swiss Data users, but also to other third party email users.
  • Set expiration timer for emails so that they are automatically deleted from your and your recipients’ mailboxes after a set period of time.

One system to protect communications online with integrated blockchain

However, it seems that Secure Swiss Data team don’t want to stop there. They want to do more to secure communications and protect privacy online. At the same time they don’t want to depend on any third party or government investment. So, they are now starting a crowdfunding campaign:

To provide the world with a unique single encrypted communications and collaboration system that will include the following features: end-to-end encrypted email, calendar, notes, tasks, file storage, collaboration in encrypted files, and end-to-end encrypted messenger. 

On top of the end-to-end encryption, the Secure Swiss Data team will integrate blockchain in the system and therefore add another layer of security, which would increase customer convenience and quality of data protection online.

The cause – Take control over your data, and protect your Online Privacy

One of the best parts of using the Secure Swiss Data services is that you know where the company stands. They have clearly stated that they believe in privacy as a human right and civil liberty. User’s data should be kept private, and no one should be able to get into those personal accounts unsolicited.

Furthermore, they say: “Privacy is not about having something to hide, it’s about the right to control what you want to share and what you want to keep to yourself.”

So, have an opportunity to make the decision on what to share and what not.

And using services like the one from Secure Swiss Data, you can do just that: have control over your online data and communications.

Robert Siciliano personal security and identity theft expert and speaker is the author of Identity Theft Privacy: Security Protection and Fraud Prevention: Your Guide to Protecting Yourself from Identity Theft and Computer Fraud. See him knock’em dead in this Security Awareness Training video.

Three Quarters of a Billion Records breached

Last year, says the security firm Gemalto, over 700 million records were breached. Or, to put it another way, this translates to two million stolen or lost records every day.

3D2015 Breach Level Report

  • 1,673 hacking incidents
  • 398 were triggered from the inside of the attacked company: employees and even IT staff who were tricked (social engineering) by hackers into clicking on malicious links or attachments
  • Government agencies suffered the greatest data leaks.
  • Following that were nation states and healthcare enterprises (remember the big Anthem breach?)

Gemalto also says that the U.S. is the leading target of cyber attacks, with the UK, Canada and Australia following behind in that order. But don’t let Australia’s fourth place standing fool you. It reports only 42 publically reported incidents, while the U.S. has reportedly had 1,222.

How can you tell your computer has been compromised by an attack?

  • Your computer is running slowly; you’re not simply being impatient—the device really is moving at a crawl. This is a possible sign the computer is infected.
  • Another possible sign of infection: Programs open up without you making them, as though they have a mind of their own.

Protecting Your Computer

  • First and foremost, businesses need to rigorously put their employees through training. This includes staged phishing attacks to see if any employees can be tricked into revealing sensitive company information. Training for workers must be ongoing, not just some annual seminar. A company could have the best security software and smartest IT staff, but all it takes is one less-than-mindful employee to let in the Trojan horse.
  • If you receive an e-mail with a link or attachment, never rush to open them. Pause. Take a few breaths. Count to 10. No matter what the subject line says, there is always plenty of time to make sure an e-mail is from a legitimate sender before opening any attachments or clicking any links.
  • Use firewall and anti-virus software and keep them updated.
  • Use a virtual private network to scramble your online activities when you’re using public Wi-Fi so that cyber snoopers see only scrambling.
  • Use the most recent version of your OS and browser.
  • Regularly back up your data.

Robert Siciliano is an identity theft expert to BestIDTheftCompanys.com discussing identity theft prevention.

How much is your Data worth online?

Cyber crime sure does pay, according to a report at Intel Security blogs.mcafee.com. There’s a boom in cyber stores that specialize in selling stolen data. In fact, this is getting so big that different kinds of hot data are being packaged—kind of like going to the supermarket and seeing how different meats or cheeses are in their own separate packages.

10DHere are some packages available on the Dark Net:

  • Credit/debit card data
  • Stealth bank transfer services
  • Bank account login credentials
  • Enterprise network login credentials
  • Online payment service login credentials

This list is not complete, either. McAfee Labs researchers did some digging and came up with some pricing.

The most in-demand type of data is probably credit/debit card, continues the blogs.mcafee.com report. The price goes up when more bits of sub-data come with the stolen data, such as the victim’s birthdate, SSN and bank account ID number. So for instance, let’s take U.S. prices:

  • Basic: $5-$8
  • With bank ID#: $15
  • With “fullzinfo” (lots more info like account password and username): $30
  • Prices in the U.K., Canada and Australia are higher across the board.

So if all you purchase is the “basic,” you have enough information to make online purchases—and can keep doing this until the card maxes out or the victim reports the unauthorized charges.

However, the “fullzinfo” will allow the thief to get into the account and change information, thwarting the victim’s attempts to get things resolved.

How much do bank login credentials cost?

  • It depends on the balance.
  • $2,200 balance: $190 for just the login information
  • For the ability to transfer funds to U.S. banks: $500 to $1,200, depending on the balance.

Online premium content services offer a variety of services, and the login credentials to these are also for sale:

  • Video streaming: $0.55 to $1
  • Cable channel streaming: $7.50
  • Professional sports streaming: $15

There are so many different kinds of accounts out there, such as hotel loyalty programs and auction. These, too, are up for sale on the underground Internet. Accounts such as these have the thief posing as the victim while carrying out online purchases.

Robert Siciliano is an identity theft expert to TheBestCompanys.com discussing  identity theft prevention.

Data security policies need teeth to be effective

Bottom line: If you have a data security policy in place, you need to make sure that it’s up to date and contains all of the necessary elements to make it effective. Here are 10 essential items that should be incorporated into all security policies:

4H1. Manage employee email

Many data breaches occur due to an employee’s misuse of email. These negligent acts can be limited by laying out clear standards related to email and data. For starters, make sure employees do not click on links or open attachments from strangers because this could easily lead to a ransomware attack.

2. Comply with software licenses and copyrights

Some organizations are pretty lax in keeping up with the copyrights and licensing of the software they use, but this is an obligation. Failing to do so could put your company at risk.

3. Address security best practices

You should be addressing the security awareness of your staff by ensuring that they are aware of security best practices for security training, testing and awareness.

4. Alert employees to the risk of using social media

All of your staff should be aware of the risks associated with social media, and consider a social media policy for your company. For example, divulging the wrong information on a social media site could lead to a data breach. Social media policy should be created in line with the security best practices.

5. Manage company-owned devices

Many employees use mobile devices in the workplace, and this opens you up to threats. You must have a formal policy in place to ensure mobile devices are used correctly. Requiring all staff to be responsible with their devices and to password protect their devices should be the minimum requirements.

6. Use password management policies

You also want to make sure that your staff is following a password policy. Passwords should be complex, never shared and changed often.

7. Have an approval process in place for employee-owned devices

With more employees than ever before using personal mobile devices for work, it is imperative that you put policies in place to protect your company’s data. Consider putting a policy in place which mandating an approval process for anyone who wants to use a mobile device at work.

8. Report all security incidents

Any time there is an incident, such as malware found on the network, a report should be made and the event should be investigated immediately by the IT team.

9. Track employee Internet use

Most staff members will use the Internet at work without much thought, but this could be dangerous. Try to establish some limits for employee Internet use for both safety and productivity.

10. Safeguard your data with a privacy policy

Finally, make sure that all staff members understand your company’s privacy policy. Make sure that data is used correctly and within the confines of the law.

Consultant Robert Siciliano is an expert in personal privacy, security and identity theft prevention. Learn more about Carbonite’s cloud and hybrid backup solutions for small and midsize businesses.

When a Company Gets Sold, So Does Your Data

When you subscribe to an online service, be careful of how much information you give out about yourself.

1PMost businesses in their terms and conditions, say they “respect your privacy.” But what if these companies go under or are sold? An article from the online New York Times explores this concept. Today’s market-data-hungry-businesses can gather lots of data about subscribers. This data can be transferred to third parties in the event the company is sold or goes belly up.

The New York Times recently analyzed the top 100 U.S. websites, and the revelation is that it’s par for the course for companies to state that subscribers’ data could be transferred as part of a sales or bankruptcy transaction. Companies like this include Google, Facebook, LinkedIn, Amazon and Apple.

On one hand, such companies assure consumers that privacy is important. Next second they’re telling you your data will get into third-party hands if they sell out or fizzle out.

A real-life example is the True.com Texas dating site that attempted to sell its customer database to another dating site. However, True.com’s privacy policy assured members that their personal details would never be sold without their permission. Texas law stopped the attempt.

The Times article points out that at least 17 of the top 100 said they’d notify customers of a data transfer, while only a handful promised an opt-out choice.

This isn’t as benign as some might think. For example, WhatsApp was sold to Facebook. A user of both services ultimately complained that Facebook, without his consent, accessed his WhatsApp contact list, even though his Facebook account was set to prevent people outside his network from obtaining his phone number.

Another example is Toysmart.com. When it went bankrupt, it tried to sell customer data, which included birthdates and names of children. The company’s privacy policy, however, promised users that this information would never be shared.

To avoid fracases, companies are now jumping on the bandwagon of stating they have the right to share customer/subscriber data with third parties per business transactions.

Don’t be surprised if you read something like: “We value your privacy,” and in another section of the privacy policy, “Upon sale of our company, your personal information may be sold.”

 

Tips to destroy and shred

You can’t be too neurotic about shredding sensitive documents to smithereens. For example, some people make a career out of “dumpster diving,” digging through trash in search of bank account information, credit card preapprovals, medical bills, mortgage statements, etc., and then they commit fraud, including creating new accounts with the found information—accounts in the victim’s name.

2PAnd by the way, anything with your signature can be a gem to the dumpster diver, as your signature can be forged.

Diving for Dollars

  • Dumpster diving is legal if the trash can is in a public spot including the big trash bin at your apartment complex.
  • Dumpster divers aren’t necessarily homeless men dressed in rags looking for discarded food. They may be professional identity thieves, and if they’re extra smart, they’ll dress like a vagrant to fool people into thinking they’re looking for food scraps.
  • Your trash can is a goldmine for an identity thief; think of what’s on all the paperwork you toss out, week after week—all sorts of tidbits about your life, from your favorite stores to your kids’ names.
  • A lot of personal details about you come simply from empty envelopes with their return addresses.

Shredding

  • Buy a shredder. There are different kinds that shred at differing dimensions as well as various strengths (some shredders will slice and dice CDs).
  • Don’t buy a “strip-cut” type, as the shreds could be reconstructed. The “micro-cut” shreds at the smallest dimensions.
  • Believe it or not, there are crooks who will take the time to put back together a shredded document, including with the help of Unshredder, a computer program.

Burning

  • Keep a cardboard box handy that you continually fill up with shreddables.
  • Just toss documents that are on deck for burning into this box as you go throughout the day. Then incinerate the box.
  • A large stack of documents will not completely burn, so don’t place these in a motley arrangement so they aren’t “thick”.

Miscellaneous

  • Don’t leave boxes that contained expensive merchandise in plain view at your curb; this is almost the equivalent of sticking a sign there with bright red letters stating: “I just purchased a giant flat screen TV; come on in and steal it.” Destroy/shred

Ask yourself this question: If someone “stole” your trash, would that be a problem? If you say yes, then you toss too much data. For me, I don’t care, nothing I toss is of any value to anyone.

Robert Siciliano is an Identity Theft Expert to Hotspot Shield. He is the author of 99 Things You Wish You Knew Before Your Identity Was Stolen See him discussing internet and wireless security on Good Morning America. Disclosures.